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FAQ

What certifications do you have?
What is the process for 2009 IECC code compliance?
What is the process for 2012 IECC code compliance?
What is the process for certifying a house to meet the ENERGY STAR® for New Homes criteria?
Do you verify compliance with the EPA’s Indoor airPLUS program?

What certifications do you have?

Our staff is fully certified by BPI and RESNET, the two industry-accepted organizations that offer residential efficiency certifications.

What is the process for 2009 IECC code compliance?

The 2009 IECC energy code was a major departure from previous energy codes. This code requires performance testing of two items – the air leakage of the entire home and the duct leakage of the HVAC system(s). Both of the allowable numbers are reasonable and can be achieved with a little diligence. In addition, the code requires increased insulation levels in some areas – notably an R-38 attic, up from an R-30. Like all past energy codes, this code has an “alternative” method for compliance that allows trade-offs, as determined by code-approved software.

ESG can help you understand this code, help you decide if the “alternative” compliance method is better for you, and air seal your new homes with guaranteed results.

What is the process for 2012 IECC code compliance?

The 2012 IECC is like the 2009 IECC, but on steroids! This code has gotten very serious about a number of items – as an example, walls are now required to be R-20, up from R-13, so there can be no more conventional 2×4 walls with wood sheathing. And the maximum air leakage rate has been reduced to a very tight, difficult-to-achieve level.

A point of concern in both the 2009 and the 2012 IECC is that the code allows conventional gas and oil heaters and water heaters. Because tightness levels of the house are required to be so low, there is a real concern about potential combustion problems.

ESG can help you understand this code, help you decide if the “alternative” compliance method is better for you, advise you on potential combustion problems and solutions, and air seal your new homes with guaranteed results.

What is the process for certifying a house to meet the ENERGY STAR® for New Homes criteria?

First the home is entered into the RESNET-approved software as-designed to learn what the HERS Index is. If it does not meet the ENERGY STAR requirements, then efficiency features must change to improve the HERS Index. The home must also meet a specific set of requirements called the National Program Requirements. ESG will help you make the most cost-effective decisions about any needed upgrades.

National Program Requirements

During construction, there are several checklists that must be completed:

  • Thermal Enclosure System Rater Checklist
  • HVAC System Quality Installation Contractor Checklist
  • HVAC System Quality Installation Rater Checklist
  • Water Management System Builder Checklist (or Indoor airPLUS Verification Checklist)

At completion and before delivery, the home is tested for air leakage and duct leakage to ensure that they match the expected levels determined in the HERS Index and required by ENERGY STAR.

Do you verify compliance with the EPA’s Indoor airPLUS program?

Yes. Indoor airPLUS is an add-on component of the ENERGY STAR program. It includes points for moisture control, radon mitigation, pest control, HVAC design and installation, combustion pollutants, materials selection, and pre-occupancy procedures. Only ENERGY STAR qualified houses are eligible for the Indoor airPLUS label, and the Indoor airPLUS label can substitute for the ENERGY STAR Water Management System Builder Checklist.

Indoor airPLUS

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